RICHARD A. KING WILDLIFE PHOTOGRAPHY 
TECHNIQUE: BLIND SIGHT
Contact me at 732-270-6154
or e-mail at


Though wildlife photography is pursued in many ways, what worked best for me was what I like to call-Observation, Innovation,and Dedication, though not not necessarily in that order. 


First: Observation:  There is no substitute for intelligence gathering.  Getting close ups of our beautiful wading birds with nothing longer than 300mm lens in a salt marsh environment, with no cover means YOU HAVE TO BE THERE BEFORE THEY ARE, AND NOT BE SEEN.  Most animals are creatures of habit.  See them there one day, and they'll likely be there the next.  Find out where they're most active.  Check to make sure the light conditions are conducive to good early morning exposures.etc,etc.  

TIP: 90% of the diet of wading birds is made up of the killie family, which hug the muddy shore lines, as do the birds that feed on them.  Now, how do you get close enough without being seen


Innovation:  Build a "blind" (or buy one, theres plenty on the market).  I like to call it "my little self induced solitary confinement".  I've made them out of wood, canvas, and even reeds.  Because the best shots are taken at, or below eye level, it should be no more than 4' high with openings on all sides (so you don't give yourself away getting out).  For a 300mm lens, place it about 20 to 25 feet from where you expect your subject to be.  Get a 5 gal. bucket to sit on, and a good tripod so you don't spook your subject sticking it in and out.  If you can leave it there, all the better. If you need permission, get it.  


Finally,  Dedication:  Do everything you can to maintain the integrity of the blind.  Remember, the important thing here is to hide the human form.  The less time you're visible, getting in and out, the better.  If you're seen, any number of animals will announce your presence.  If you do it right, you're blind will become an acceptable part of the environment no mater where you move it.

 

It Isn't easy, it takes time, but it works, and you WILL be rewarded.  I believe even more important than the shots you'll  take, are the things you'll see, learn and experience, and where the amazing questions that arise will take you.  I know for me It's been one of the most mind altering experiences of my life.  I hope it is for you.  My site is a product of this experience: http://www.richardkingwildlifephotography.com/

Rear entrance-Zipper has double tabs so it can be opened from either side, inside or outside.  Guide lines on 4 sides a must for stability against the weather.  The 4' copper legs can also be pushed into the sod for even better stability. 
Front opening for camera-inside.  Sides must have same openings for observatio, ans possible shots.
Rear entrance-Zipper has double tabs so it can be opened from either side, inside or outside.  Guide lines on 4 sides a must for stability against the weather.  The 4' copper legs can also be pushed into the sod for even better stability. 
The Prone Blind - I designed this blind to get an even lower angle.  Though this one has a hinged center (which I thought would make it more portable, but didn't) It's made with a piece of 1/2" plywood 2' high and 4' wide with a rectangular opening for the front.  And 2 hinged side pieces (angular) to hold it erect. 
A plastic tarp is then thrown over it, and stapled to the front.  A half loop of coper or plastic tubing fixed across the front is necessary to hold the tarp off your head.  Strips of material can be stapled over the opening to further hide you.  For animals that like to roost in an environment that has none a cedar stump is like a magnet.

 Photos, Note Cards and Greeting Cards

of the
Barnegat Bay
Any of the wildlife photos you see on this site can be purchased by contacting me at:
Local slide lectures also available
For more info feel free to drop me an e-mail any time
Please be patient as this site is still under construction