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      NORTHERN HARRIER (Circus cyaneus)
Of all the species on this site, there's none I've spent more time
 photographing (and studying) than this unique raptor.  
Being the only hawk I know of that spends it's entire seasonal
 life cycle on the lower Barnegat Bay, I've watched them in mating
 rituals fledging their young, mantling,  fighting, and even
 copulating.
 The photos you'll see here were taken over a span of 13 years of a

Of all the species on this site, there's none I've spent more time photographing (and studying) than this unique raptor.


The only hawk I know of that spends it's entire seasonal life cycle on the lower Barnegat Bay. I've watched them in mating rituals fledging their young, mantling, fighting, and even copulating. 


The photos you'll see here were taken over a span of 13 years of a single group of marsh whwks.

Of all the species on this site, there's none I've spent more time
 photographing (and studying) than this unique raptor.  
Being the only hawk I know of that spends it's entire seasonal
 life cycle on the lower Barnegat Bay, I've watched them in mating
 rituals fledging their young, mantling,  fighting, and even
 copulating.
 The photos you'll see here were taken over a span of 13 years of a

The first shot of the only Male Marsh Hawk ( Northern HarrierI) I  have ever photographed or seen.  And the begining of a technique I've used for the many years to come.

Of all the species on this site, there's none I've spent more time
 photographing (and studying) than this unique raptor.  
Being the only hawk I know of that spends it's entire seasonal
 life cycle on the lower Barnegat Bay, I've watched them in mating
 rituals fledging their young, mantling,  fighting, and even
 copulating.
 The photos you'll see here were taken over a span of 13 years of a

The images you see above were, for many years, not only the Marsh Hawks habitat, it was mine. Every chance I had in early spring and late fall for the late afternoon light, I would be there.


The Secondary Dune, seen here, was where it started, and where many of these shots were taken.  It sat on the edge of the Maritime Forest overlooking our expansive Salt Marsh where it hunted, and nested. The inset image was the rough proximity of those nests.


Nest location for those familiar with Island Beach St. Pk. A stones throw ( or two ) west of the old 112 C.G. Station (The New Interpretation Center).

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 Of all the species on this site, there's none I've spent more time
 photographing (and studying) than this unique raptor.  
Being the only hawk I know of that spends it's entire seasonal
 life cycle on the lower Barnegat Bay, I've watched them in mating
 rituals fledging their young, mantling,  fighting, and even
 copulating.
 The photos you'll see here were taken over a span of 13 years of a

FINAL IMAGE


MY LAST GOOD SHOT OF THIS UNIQUE RAPTOR I'DE FOLLOWED LIKE A FAMILIAR FRIEND FOR ALMOST   13 YRS.